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Stem Cells safe and effective in treatment for arthritis of the knee

29/04/2019

A clinical trial has shown that a single injection of bone marrow MSCs (mesenchymal stem cells) is safe and results in improvement in pain levels and quality of life in patients with late-stage osteoarthritis of the knee.

Given the source of these stem cells are from bone, it is no surprise that these cells can be put to use in applications of cartilage; the important connective tissue that aids movement by connecting bones.

As we age all cells in our body deteriorate, and it is common for individuals report symptoms of Osteoarthritis. This condition that causes joints to become painful and stiff. In the UK the most common form of Osteoarthritis is Arthritis where more than 10 million people have arthritis or other, similar conditions that affect the joints. Arthritis however does affects people of all ages, including children.

The clinical trial results published this month are one of many developments in the area of Osteoarthritis, where specialist stem cells are injected into the joint area with the aim to provide renewed functionality to the cells that have become less active or even dysfunctional. The conclusion of the trial saw improved effectiveness of the connective tissue, resulting in reducing pain associated with the condition in turn improved quality of life for patients.

“Our goal was to test for safety as well as to gain a better understanding of MSC dosing, mechanisms of action and donor selection,” said Dr. Viswanathan who was part of a wider research team the Arthritis Program at the Krembil Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, led by Sowmya Viswanathan, Ph.D., and Jaskarndip Chahal.

12 patients were involved aged from 45 to 65 with moderate osteoarthritis of the knee. The patients were divided in to 3 groups, each received a different dose of MSCs then were followed for 12 months.

At the end of the 12 month period, significant improvements were evident in the patients; there was less experienced pain and an increase in quality of life. The study also concluded MSCs were safe at various dose levels, and with a higher dose the results were more effective.

The type of stem cells used in the trial were sourced from bone marrow. The process often includes an invasive procedure to isolate cells from the bone, most commonly from the pelvis (hip bone). The are alternative source of MSCs that are commonly taken advantage of by parents who bank cells for their children – from the umbilical cord tissue at the time of birth, and also from naturally shed baby teeth.

Here at BioEden we have in fact had a stem cell samples realised in a private therapy for knee repair, the cells isolated by us (from teeth) and banked were released for use to repair the cartilage in our customers knee.

Thousands of parents globally choose to bank stem cells to protect their children’s future health, allowing one’s own cells to accessed for treatment should they be required and of use. For all it is perceived by some these cells may one day save and change lives through more extreme measures such as reversing a condition such as diabetes or re-growing certain cells of the body, an organ for example, this study prove this material is anticipated to be of use for general wear and tear as we age, having access to youthful cells for use in therapy helping aid the effects of old age in years to come.

References:
Benzinga. “Clinical Trial Shows Promise of Stem Cells in Offering Safe, Effective Relief from Arthritic Knees | Benzinga.” Benzinga, Benzinga, 9 Apr. 2019, www.benzinga.com/pressreleases/19/04/r13509497/clinical-trial-shows-promise-of-stem-cells-in-offering-safe-effective-relief-from-arthritic-knees. Accessed 10 Apr. 2019.
Chahal, Jaskarndip, et al. “Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Patients with Osteoarthritis Results in Overall Improvement in Pain and Symptoms and Reduces Synovial Inflammation.” STEM CELLS Translational Medicine, 9 Apr. 2019, 10.1002/sctm.18-0183. Accessed 10 Apr. 2019.